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Cardinal Maurizio di Savoia
(1593-1657)


Other Titles and Honours

Principe d'Oneglia[1]

Positions Held

Deacon of Santa Maria in Via Lata, 1626-42[3]
Commendatory abbot of Casanova, Saluzzo, 1618[3]
Lieutenant-general of Piedmont, 1615[3]
Archbishop of Monreale[2]
Bishop of Vercelli, 1611[2]
Canon in Turin, 1611[2]
Abbot commendatario of S. Michele della Chiusa, 1611

Main Events

After receiving his education in Spain, Maurizio entered an ecclesiastical career from a very early age for political reasons, having never taken his vows.[3] He was sent to Rome in 1623 and took part in the election of Pope Urban VIII. His brother Duke Vittorio Amedeo I signed the 1634 treaty of Rivoli with France which Maurizio opposed, and so he defected to Spain and the Empire, accepting their protection. He tried to return to Piedmont in 1638 to put forward his claim for the regency of Savoy, but he was not granted permission to enter by his sister-in-law the Madama Reale, the dowager duchess (and his future mother-in-law), who was supported by France. With some support offered by Spain, Maurizio, along with his brother Thomas, was able to win great support for his cause through the publication of a manifesto opposing the Madama Reale, and eventually, the people became divided in two sides known as the Cardinalists and the Madamists, sparking a civil war. Maurizio was able to capture most of the important cities by late 1639. Once the Madama Reale realised that defeat was near, she offered Maurizio her daughter's hand in marriage. He resigned his ecclesiastical offices and married.[2]

Place of marriage: Turin[4]
Place of death: Turin[4]
Place of burial: San Michele della Chiusa, Turin[2]


 
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Sources

1. S. Guichenon. Histoire généalogique de la royale maison de Savoie, vol. 2. Turin: chez Jean-Michel Briolo, 1778.

2. Enciclopedia italiana di scienze, lettere ed arti, Vol. 30, Romania - Scap. Milano: Ist. Giovanni Treccani, 1936.

3. S. Miranda. Savoia, Maurizio di (1593-1657), The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Florida International University Libraries, 2018.

4. H. Montgomery-Massingberd, ed. Burke's Royal Families of the World. Volume I: Europe & Latin America. London: Burke’s Peerage Ltd., 1977.
 

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